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Media Release 2015

New types of Genetically Modified food to escape testing?

MADGE is concerned that new forms of plant breeding will escape all regulation and assessment.(1)

"Our food standards body, FSANZ, appears to be allowing risky new types of Genetic Modified food to appear on our plates without any assessment, regulation or monitoring." Said Fran Murrell from MADGE. "We will have no idea how what we eat is being altered and what effects that may have on us or the soils, animals, birds and bees."

Stealth changes to food act mean new technologies to go unassessed

MADGE is concerned that the definition of gene technology, GMO and GM product will be removed via proposed changes to the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991. The Food Standards Australia New Zealand Amendment (Forum on Food Regulation and Other Measures) Bill 2015 was scheduled for debate in the House and Senate during October.

"This appears to be to allow risky new forms of Genetic Modification to appear on our plates without any assessment, regulation or monitoring." Said Fran Murrell from MADGE.

Nanoparticles: dangerous experiments disguised as dinner

We are eating unlabelled and untested nano particles in food. Nano titanium dioxide and silica were found in every one of the 14 products tested in research commissioned by Friends of the Earth.(1)

"When kids are given M&Ms as a treat or Old El Paso Taco mix for dinner it appears we are unknowingly feeding them nanoparticles that may be unsafe." Said Fran Murrell of MADGE

Events in Sydney this week discuss problems in food production that are impacting children’s health

A study released last week is likely to give families and industry a shake up.

According to a study released on Friday by Flinders University in South Australia, Roundup, at levels below those deemed safe in Australian drinking water, caused cell death and hormone disruption, with a decrease in progesterone levels.

This study comes after the World Health Organisation (WHO) this month labelled Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, a probable carcinogen.

Toxic levels for Australian drinking water

A new study has found that the world’s most commonly used weed killer, Roundup, is toxic to human cells at levels permitted in Australia’s drinking water.

The study released by Flinders University in South Australia, tested the effects of Roundup, based on the levels deemed safe in Australian drinking water. The results found it caused human placental cell death. This study suggests that if these concentrations of Roundup are present in the body they may cause adverse health issues.

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